Rayman Boozer Fights for Inclusion (and Color!) in Interior Design

In addition to shaking up physical spaces, Boozer is also committed to moving the design

In addition to shaking up physical spaces, Boozer is also committed to moving the design industry to be more inclusive of LGBTQ+ folks and people of color. Three years ago, he joined the Black Artists + Designers Guild after a friend, Malene Barnett, noticed “an extreme lack of diversity” at an industry gathering. Its founding by Barnett in 2018 “led to an immediate and resounding response from vendors, editors, and designers alike,” he says of BADG, which advocates for Black representation in the global design industry.

As a designer, Boozer himself is paying more attention to the identities of artists. For example, a recent collaboration with S. Harris, the Orejen Collection, includes wall coverings, trimming, and fabrics inspired by Bhutan, Zanzibar, and Maori cultures. The collection “intends to shine a light on groups typically underserved in the design world,” Boozer notes.